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20121007
20121007
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for the first two years. joe martin was speaker of the house and he had a very difficult time dealing with republicans on capitol hill. the democrats took over in the election of 1954. >> sam rayburn became speaker can and lyndon johnson was majority leader. eisenhower got along marvelously with rayburn johnson. eisenhower have did to be born in the district which it heard. they thought alike and they put the national interest first. they were aware of the party interest as well and almost all of the legislation in the eisenhower period period stems from a time when it was a democratic congress. it was a different time in that respect and that differ slightly from the answer to the first question as to where eisenhower would be today. back in 1952, running for the republican nomination, seems to me and eisenhower defeated the republican party of today. >> on that note -- the. [laughter] [applause] >> see would be defeated in the republican party of today. [applause] >> it would like to thank our distinguished panelists and it's been an honor to have the three of them here. i urge you
is nominated to become chief justice. the senators birch bikeby, ted canady, joe biden, they don't lay a hand on him early and so he is so excellent that perry and these questions and the hearing record of 71 is closed and suddenly shortly before the vote is to take place on rehnquist and also one lewis powell who is was up at the same time, shortly before that the vote is to occur but after the hearings are closed "newsweek" magazine, the supreme court reporter for "newsweek," really great guy, he comes up somehow with this memo from the jackson files, the memo relating to brown versus board of education and it's a bombshell. and so, birch by, the senator from a very liberal and a great senator from indiana at that time, birch bias at this point leading the fight against rehnquist. he is leading the liberal fight against rehnquist and they know it's going to be close and they probably know it's going to go down -- but it's close. he starts really pushing in the publicity starts coming out and nixon and his attorney general john mitchell who actually have kind of concocted this whole rehnquis
-policy experience. she said really the thing that made a difference in joe biden versus her wasn't foreign-policy experience and she agreed those essential appears to shoot several strikes start, but she's been a very good cabinet secretary. and who knows what that may take her 2016. >> okay. part or i suspect i know who will take the lead him out of nancy kassebaum. >> we put me in the end for several reasons. one, the first woman elected to the senate in her own right. there was an article about what the science article written about 30 or 35 years ago about the women in congress and the title was over his dead body. and there's still quite a few women in congress who got their because their husbands die. some of the first women, she followed her husband who had died when the policy and then took that over. and so, kassebaum was the first one who would never followed the south. and now once again gave her a lot of tension. it is a very highly visible rays, covered even one of the london newspapers commented it the day after the election. q. we have one woman in the senate. if you're one
, employment, home. so if anybody else makes any one of those criteria can for example come his son joe hill no longer lives in the state of maine, we collecting. we've been collecting books since 1836 year the library. we have a number of unique or very rare items. for instance, we have a copy of the first edition of the book of mormon, which has been in the state library since approximately 1848, was published in 1830. the first run was 5000 copies and in institutions there were fewer than 10% of that left. what makes our copy a little bit different is if you can do the maine state library, will pull it out of the state do much to at it. with gloves. because that connection to sacred literature is so important to so many people, that we think that is something valuable we can do. we believe in preserving books. but there's no point in preserving them without access. so that is something we do with that of the differently than other libraries. there is one item that we do not let anybody actually touch. and that is the martha ballard diaries. martha ballard was a midwife lived in hollow man
, employment, home, anybody else meets one of the criteria, his son, joe hills no longer lives? the state of maine. we claim him. we have been collected books since 1836. we have a number of unique or rare items. for instance we have a copy of the first edition of the book of mormon. which has been in the state library since approximately 1848. it was published in 1830. the first one was 5,000 copies. they were only in institutions there are fewer than 10% of that left. that makes our copy a little bit different. if you don't maine state library. we would full out of the safe and let you look at it with gloves. because that connection to literature is important so many people. that we think it's something valuable we can do. we believe in preserving books, but there's no point in preserving them without access. so that's something we do a little bit differently than other libraries. there is one item that we do not let anybody actually touch. and that's the martha ballard dares. martha ballard was a midwife who lived in maine, the next town down the river from 1785 to 1812. she kept a han
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5